EIEC Webinar: How Persistent are Developmental Delays in Young Children in the US?


pdf File How Persistent are Developmental Delays in Young Children in the US? Presentation (458KB) [download]

Archived Recording
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Tuesday, August 27, 2013
4:00pm - 5:00pmET


Frequent and systematic developmental screening is recommended because developmental delays are presumed to be dynamic and modifiable. Yet, little is known about the persistence of young children’s developmental delays. This presentation will explore this issue using data from 2 longitudinal samples of US children. The findings have important implications for how developmental services should be configured. This talk is geared toward MCH professionals who work with young children at risk for developmental difficulties.

A Webinar from AUCD's Early Intervention/ Early Childhood (EIEC) Special Interest Group.



Beth M. McManus, PT, MPH, ScD, Assistant Professor, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Children’s Outcomes Research Group, Children’s Hospital Colorado

Dr. McManus is a pediatric physical therapist who has worked in a variety of clinical settings including early intervention, school system, children’s hospitals, and the newborn intensive care unit. She received her ScD in Developmental Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health and an MPH in Maternal and Child Health and a MS in Physical Therapy from Boston University. Her research investigates population health interventions -- such as early intervention (EI) -- for children with special health care needs. Beth is interested in many aspects of EI–including access, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of service delivery. Beth is a former Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at the University of Madison-Wisconsin. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Systems, Management and Policy at Colorado School of Public Health and a methodologist in the Children’s Outcomes Research group Children’s Hospital Colorado.

Steven Rosenberg, Ph.D.,Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado Denver

Steven Rosenberg, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado Denver. He is a psychologist, who in addition to clinical practice, has directed and evaluated programs for children with disabilities and their parents. He has also directed demonstration projects that developed procedures used by school staff to increase access to learning activities by pupils with complex disabilities. He has been a co-investigator on the CADDRE (Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research and Epidemiology) project, since its inception in 2001. He serves on the CADDRE Sociodemographic Risk Factors Analytic Workgroup, where he has major responsibility for developing testable hypotheses and analytic strategies relevant to service and treatment in relation to sociodemographic characteristics. His publications include a report of a randomized trial of home visiting services to families at-risk for both child welfare and Part C involvement. His most recent publications have examined likely rates of Part C eligibility associated with current definitions of developmental delay.



Cordelia Robinson, PhD, RN, Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry Director, JFK Partners University of Colorado School of Medicine

Since 1993 Dr. Robinson has been Director of JFK Partners, an interdepartmental program of Pediatrics and Psychiatry at the CU School of Medicine. In this role she is responsible for providing leadership, direction to an interdisciplinary professional staff of over 40 faculty members. Dr. Robinson has professional preparation in Nursing (BS) Special Education (MA) and Developmental Psychology with a research specialty in Intellectual Disabilities (PhD) from Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. She is currently Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry. She has worked in the field of early intervention for children with developmental disabilities as a clinician, researcher and educator of personnel from multiple disciplines since 1973. She has been the PI on over 30 federally funded demonstration, training or research projects in the field of Developmental Disabilities and Intellectual Disabilities. Work since 2001 has been focused on Autism Spectrum Disorders.


This webinar is made possible with support from
the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and
the Maternal and Child Health Bureau.